Can Credit Ruin Your Love Life?

Written by Lindsay Meredith on August 23, 2013

What are you looking for in a mate? Good looks? A sense of humor? Intelligence? Loyalty? While these are undeniably attractive qualities, for a lot of people they aren’t enough. It appears that in the 21st century a nice smile and a quick wit do not the ideal partner make. For more and more singles on the dating circuit these days, the answer to the question of what they want in a boyfriend or girlfriend may surprise you: a good credit score.

As unsexy as picking a date based on her credit score might sound, the trend towards looking for a match in love and money is undeniable. More people than ever before are interested in finding a mate whose money smarts and habits match their own, and they aren’t afraid to broach financial topics with their dates. A subject that used to be as taboo as politics or religion has been transformed into casual dinner table banter.

In order to fulfill an unmet need in the online dating scene, some clever entrepreneurs have created matchmaking sites that pair up singles based on their credit scores. The idea is that people with similar credit scores will have similar financial values, and that this is an important set of beliefs to share when searching for a long-term relationship. It’s hard to deny that money issues can be a definite sore spot in a relationship, and many people whose marriages have been destroyed by such problems often admit that they wish they had moved on when they realized their partner wasn’t on board with their financial goals. Wouldn’t it be great to minimize the potential for disagreement before the relationship even begins?

But the popularity of sites like CreditScoreDating makes some people wonder if our society has lost touch with too many of its traditional values related to dating and marriage. Whatever happened to looking for someone who challenges us intellectually or makes us laugh? Have we really become so unromantic that searching for a partner based on a single, impersonal piece of data about them seems like a good idea?

All this begs the question: would you use a credit score dating site? Tell us why or why not in the comments below!

Posted Under: Credit
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About Lindsay Meredith

Lindsay is a high school teacher and personal finance blogger. She lives, works, and plays in the Washington, D.C. area.


Aug23

What are you looking for in a mate? Good looks? A sense of humor? Intelligence? Loyalty? While these are undeniably attractive qualities, for a lot of people they aren’t enough. It appears that in the 21st century a nice smile and a quick wit do not the ideal partner make. For more and more singles on the dating circuit these days, the answer to the question of what they want in a boyfriend or girlfriend may surprise you: a good credit score.

As unsexy as picking a date based on her credit score might sound, the trend towards looking for a match in love and money is undeniable. More people than ever before are interested in finding a mate whose money smarts and habits match their own, and they aren’t afraid to broach financial topics with their dates. A subject that used to be as taboo as politics or religion has been transformed into casual dinner table banter.

In order to fulfill an unmet need in the online dating scene, some clever entrepreneurs have created matchmaking sites that pair up singles based on their credit scores. The idea is that people with similar credit scores will have similar financial values, and that this is an important set of beliefs to share when searching for a long-term relationship. It’s hard to deny that money issues can be a definite sore spot in a relationship, and many people whose marriages have been destroyed by such problems often admit that they wish they had moved on when they realized their partner wasn’t on board with their financial goals. Wouldn’t it be great to minimize the potential for disagreement before the relationship even begins?

But the popularity of sites like CreditScoreDating makes some people wonder if our society has lost touch with too many of its traditional values related to dating and marriage. Whatever happened to looking for someone who challenges us intellectually or makes us laugh? Have we really become so unromantic that searching for a partner based on a single, impersonal piece of data about them seems like a good idea?

All this begs the question: would you use a credit score dating site? Tell us why or why not in the comments below!

About Lindsay Meredith
Lindsay is a high school teacher and personal finance blogger. She lives, works, and plays in the Washington, D.C. area.